Skip to:

Past Events

View events by calendar year
Enter one or more keywords to search for
Filter by event type
Thursday, October 10, 2013 -
4:00pm to 5:15pm

 Speaker

Speaker: Eric Dunham

Assistant Prof. Geophysics, Stanford University

This seminar series is designed for a student audience. The idea of the seminar is for faculty to describe their research, their philosophy or specific projects in broad terms at a level that students can easily follow. The style is informal to encourage a dialog rather than a one-way flow. Computer projectors are rarely used except to display images. Also the lack of faculty in the audience enables the student to be the ones asking the questions. The less preparation the presenter makes the better. Anything that is not completely familiar to the speaker is not something that the students need to know.Since this is informal for the speaker we hope that there will a large number of faculty that will respond to request that they speak. We also extend the list of speakers to include senior students with a particular focus on those who no longer sit in ICME space and do not have an ICME adviser. The class is also encouraged to make suggestions for speakers and can if they wish invite speakers.

Wednesday, October 9, 2013 -
10:00am to 3:00pm

Join us at complimentary MATLAB seminars at Stanford University.  Faculty, staff and students are all welcome to register and attend:

Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013
Location: Turing Auditorium, Polya Hall
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Our event features two technical sessions presented by MathWorks engineers, including Principal MATLAB Developer Loren Shure, who has worked at MathWorks for more than 20 years.  Loren has co-authored several products and currently works on the design of the MATLAB language. 

10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.: Session 1: Programming with MATLAB

Learn about the programming capabilities of MATLAB and how you can use them to work more productively.

1:00 – 3:00 p.m.: Session 2: Parallel Computing with MATLAB

Learn how to solve computationally and data-intensive problems using multicore processors, GPUs, and computer clusters. 

View complete session descriptions and register at: www.mathworks.com/seminars/Stanford2013.

We hope you can join us. 

Monday, October 7, 2013 -
4:15pm to 5:15pm

 Speaker

Speaker: Katherine J. Evans

Climate Change Science Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Computational strategies for simulation and analysis of high resolution global climate modeling

Global Earth system models have been developed with finer spatial resolution to enable global simulations that resolve regional and local climate. Recent improvements to component dynamical cores and effective utilization of DOE leadership class computing systems have enabled these model configurations to be run with reasonable throughput. However, additional near-term improvements to these high-resolution models, which include increasingly multiscale and coupled equations, more complete process models that handle multiple spatial resolutions around the globe, and the transport of numerous additional tracers of chemical and moisture-based variables, will increase computational costs and create unknown accuracy issues when coupled together. I will present progress towards the incorporation of implicit-based time-stepping methods designed to improve efficiency, accuracy, and robustness within several components of the Community Earth System Model and show some recent analysis of high-resolution atmosphere simulations that motivate this work.

Thursday, October 3, 2013 -
4:00pm to 5:15pm

Speaker

Speaker: Vijay Pande

Prof. Chemistry, Stanford University

This seminar series is designed for a student audience. The idea of the seminar is for faculty to describe their research, their philosophy or specific projects in broad terms at a level that students can easily follow. The style is informal to encourage a dialog rather than a one-way flow. Computer projectors are rarely used except to display images. Also the lack of faculty in the audience enables the student to be the ones asking the questions. The less preparation the presenter makes the better. Anything that is not completely familiar to the speaker is not something that the students need to know.Since this is informal for the speaker we hope that there will a large number of faculty that will respond to request that they speak. We also extend the list of speakers to include senior students with a particular focus on those who no longer sit in ICME space and do not have an ICME adviser. The class is also encouraged to make suggestions for speakers and can if they wish invite speakers.

Monday, September 30, 2013 -
4:15pm to 5:15pm

Image

Speaker: Georg Stadler

Institute for Computational Engineering and Science, University of Texas at Austin

Hessian-based uncertainty quantification in Bayesian inference, with applications to large-scale seismic inversion

I will address the problem of quantifying uncertainty in the solution of inverse problems governed by partial differential equations (PDEs) within the framework of Bayesian inference. The posterior probability density is explored using local Gaussian approximations based on gradients and Hessians of the log posterior. Computations with these derivatives for inverse problems governed by expensive-to-solve PDEs are made computationally feasible through the use of adjoint methods and low rank ideas, which exploit the fact that the data are typically informative only about a low-dimensional subspace of the parameter fields. These methods are applied to a synthetic global seismic inversion problem, in which the local wave speed is inferred from seismogram data. This requires the repeated solution of large-scale elastic wave propagation problems, for which a high-order discontinuous Galerkin discretization is used. I will discuss implementation aspects of this method, its parallel scalability to 100,000s of CPU cores and challenges arising in the computation of derivatives with respect to the local wave speed due to the use of the discontinuous Galerkin method. For the global seismic inversion test problem, I will show variance fields and samples drawn from the distribution of the inferred local wave speeds. Parts of this talk are based on joint work with Tan Bui-Thanh, Carsten Burstedde, James Martin, Omar Ghattas and Lucas Wilcox.

Thursday, September 26, 2013 -
4:00pm to 5:15pm

 Speaker

Speaker : Ron Dror

Associate Prof. Computer Science, Stanford University

This seminar series is designed for a student audience. The idea of the seminar is for faculty to describe their research, their philosophy or specific projects in broad terms at a level that students can easily follow. The style is informal to encourage a dialog rather than a one-way flow. Computer projectors are rarely used except to display images. Also the lack of faculty in the audience enables the student to be the ones asking the questions. The less preparation the presenter makes the better. Anything that is not completely familiar to the speaker is not something that the students need to know. Since this is informal for the speaker we hope that there will a large number of faculty that will respond to request that they speak. We also extend the list of speakers to include senior students with a particular focus on those who no longer sit in ICME space and do not have an ICME adviser. The class is also encouraged to make suggestions for speakers and can if they wish invite speakers.

Monday, September 23, 2013 -
4:15pm to 5:15pm

 Speaker

Speaker: Donald DePaolo

Associate Laboratory Director for Energy & Environmental Area at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Geochemistry Professor at UC Berkeley

Models and data go together: Computational isotope geochemistry

Much of geochemistry is predicated on the expectation that new analytical tools will allow us to make unprecedented measurements that will then automatically increase our understanding of natural materials and processes.  To a fair degree this is true, and it is unquestionably the case that new measurements fuel scientific progress.  However, when it comes to evaluating what we actually know, models are critical, and for the most part they are undervalued.  In my research I have concentrated on relatively simple, heuristic models that can illustrate key aspects of the behavior of complex systems.  This approach has turned out to have value, because other researchers can understand the models for the most part and use them.  Now it is possible, and with collaborations we have been making progress, to extend the simple models to more systematic numerical approaches that require fewer approximations.  In this talk I will give some examples of the simpler approaches and how we have been able to use them to help guide development of more computationally demanding models, with the applications relating to moisture transport in the atmosphere, diffusion and crystallization in magmas prior to volcanic eruptions, reactive transport in fluid-rock systems where flow is mainly through fractures, and precipitation of minerals from aqueous solutions.

Thursday, September 19, 2013 -
9:00am to 4:00pm

The ICME refresher course is a four day long course intended to provide incoming students with an opportunity to review material relevant to their upcoming coursework. Students have two options when taking the refresher course. The recommended option for incoming ICME students is the ICME track, which is specifically structured to cover material relevant to the ICME core courses. The second option is primarily intended for other incoming students and allows for the selection of two courses on specific topics.

Wednesday, September 18, 2013 -
9:00am to 4:00pm

The ICME refresher course is a four day long course intended to provide incoming students with an opportunity to review material relevant to their upcoming coursework. Students have two options when taking the refresher course. The recommended option for incoming ICME students is the ICME track, which is specifically structured to cover material relevant to the ICME core courses. The second option is primarily intended for other incoming students and allows for the selection of two courses on specific topics.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013 -
9:00am to 4:00pm

The ICME refresher course is a four day long course intended to provide incoming students with an opportunity to review material relevant to their upcoming coursework. Students have two options when taking the refresher course. The recommended option for incoming ICME students is the ICME track, which is specifically structured to cover material relevant to the ICME core courses. The second option is primarily intended for other incoming students and allows for the selection of two courses on specific topics.

Monday, September 16, 2013 -
9:00am to 4:00pm

The ICME refresher course is a four day long course intended to provide incoming students with an opportunity to review material relevant to their upcoming coursework. Students have two options when taking the refresher course. The recommended option for incoming ICME students is the ICME track, which is specifically structured to cover material relevant to the ICME core courses. The second option is primarily intended for other incoming students and allows for the selection of two courses on specific topics.

Wednesday, December 12, 2012 -
8:00am to 5:00pm

BASCD is an annual informal gathering to encourage interaction and collaboration of research in scientific computing and computational science/engineering in the Bay Area. This year BASCD is organized by ICME in collaboration with the Scientific Computing division at SLAC.

Thursday, November 29, 2012 -
10:00am to 2:00pm

A Stanford-hosted student event organized by ICME, NVIDIA, and Ignite. Rivalries- a videogame competition- placed college teams up against each other in the popular Call of Duty franchise. 

Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - 12:15pm to Friday, July 13, 2012 - 6:00pm

MMDS 2012. Workshop on Algorithms for Modern Massive Data Sets

Stanford University
July 10–13, 2012

Synopsis

The Workshops on Algorithms for Modern Massive Data Sets (MMDS 2012) addressed algorithmic and statistical challenges in modern large-scale data analysis. The goals of this series of workshops are to explore novel techniques for modeling and analyzing massive, high-dimensional, and nonlinearly-structured scientific and internet data sets; and to bring together computer scientists, statisticians, mathematicians, and data analysis practitioners to promote the cross-fertilization of ideas.

Details, agendas, and more:  http://web.stanford.edu/group/mmds/original2012.html

Friday, April 13, 2012 -
9:00am to 4:00pm

A Stanford-hosted conference organized by ICME and NVIDIA corp.

Stanford faculty and researchers speak about how heterogeneous computing with GPUs is important to sustaining and advancing the state of the art in scientific and research computing. 

Sunday, May 8, 2011 -
8:00am to 5:00pm

BASCD is an annual informal gathering to encourage interaction and collaboration of research in scientific computing and computational science/engineering in the Bay Area. This event provides a great venue for junior researchers to present their work to the local community, and for the Bay Area scientific and computational science/engineering communities at a large to interchange views on today's multidisciplinary computational challenges and state-of-the-art developments. This year BASCD was organized by ICME.

Saturday, May 7, 2011 -
9:00am to 5:00pm

This event showcased computational mathematics in a variety of engineering applications and natural processes. ICME Faculty and advanced students will give talks. Organized by ICME with key-note speech from NVIDIA. 

Wednesday, June 25, 2008 - 10:00am to Saturday, June 28, 2008 - 6:30pm

A Stanford-hosted conference organized by Michael Mahoney (Yahoo! Research), Lek-Heng Lim (University of California, Berkeley), Petros Drineas (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute), and Gunnar Carlsson (Stanford University). It deals with algorithms suitable to the analysis of modern massive data sets.

Synopsis

The 2008 Workshop on Algorithms for Modern Massive Data Sets (MMDS 2008) addressed algorithmic, mathematical, and statistical challenges in modern large-scale data analysis. The goals of MMDS 2008 were to explore novel techniques for modeling and analyzing massive, high-dimensional, and nonlinearly-structured scientific and internet data sets, and to bring together computer scientists, statisticians, mathematicians, and data analysis practitioners to promote cross-fertilization of ideas.

Details, agenda, and more: http://stanford.edu/group/mmds/mmds2008.html

Saturday, March 1, 2008 -
8:00am to 5:00pm

This symposium, to honor Gene Golub's scientific contributions, was organized by Chen Greif (University of British Columbia) and Dianne O'Leary (University of Maryland), with assistance from Sou-Cheng Choi, Peter Glynn, Jim Lambers, and Michael Saunders. 

Additional information: http://www.stat.wisc.edu/~wahba/talks1/golub.08/march1program.pdf

Friday, February 29, 2008 -
2:00pm to 5:00pm

A celebration in memory of Gene Golub, professor emeritus of computer science who died Nov. 16 at age 75, is scheduled from 2 to 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 29, in the Old Union Ballroom. 

 event organized by Leah Friedman, Jim Lambers, Walter Murray, and Margot Gerritsen.

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2008/february27/golub-022708.html

Thursday, March 29, 2007 - 12:00pm to Saturday, March 31, 2007 - 12:00pm

This conference, to review past accomplishments in scientific computing at Stanford, celebrate Gene Golub's 75th birthday, and contemplate the next 50 years of computational mathematics and numerical computing, was organized by Ding-Zhu Du (University of Texas at Dallas), Charbel Farhat, Walter Murray, Michael Overton (New York University), Haesun Park (Georgia Tech), Michael Saunders, and Jim Varah (University of British Columbia).

 

http://compmath50.stanford.edu/

Wednesday, June 21, 2006 - 10:00am to Saturday, June 24, 2006 - 6:30pm

MMDS 2006. Workshop on Algorithms for Modern Massive Data Sets

Stanford University and Yahoo! Research
June 21–24, 2006

MMDS 2012. Workshop on Algorithms for Modern Massive Data Sets, Stanford, CA, July 10–13, 2012.

Synopsis

The 2006 Workshop on Algorithms for Modern Massive Data Sets (MMDS 2006) addressed algorithmic, mathematical, and statistical challenges in modern large-scale data analysis. The goals of MMDS 2008 were to explore novel techniques for modeling and analyzing massive, high-dimensional, and nonlinearly-structured scientific and internet data sets, and to bring together computer scientists, statisticians, mathematicians, and data analysis practitioners to promote cross-fertilization of ideas.

 

Details: http://web.stanford.edu/group/mmds/mmds2006.html

Monday, February 9, 2004 - 2:00pm to Tuesday, February 10, 2004 - 5:30pm

A two-day workshop took place at Stanford University to celebrate the birthdays and accomplishments of Alan George, Michael Saunders, and Jim Varah, and was organized by Michael Friedlander (Argonne National Labs), Gene Golub, Chen Greif (University of British Columbia), and Esmond Ng (Lawrence Berkeley Lab).

http://web.stanford.edu/group/svg/

Pages